Lectures

Invited lectures

  • Insights into the cognitive processes underlying speech processing in the presence of background noise. Invited symposium on ‘Computational and Quantitative methods in Understanding the Neurobiology of Language’ during the 2017 annual meeting of the Society for Neurobiology of Language, Baltimore, MD, 9 November, 2017.
  • Listening in a non-native language in the presence of background noise. Colloquium series „The active auditory system“, University of Oldenburg, Germany, 19 May, 2017.
  • The effect of background noise on native and non-native listening. Symposium on ‘Advancing Behavioral and Cognitive Understanding of Speech (ABACUS)’, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 14 January, 2017.
  • Investigating speech and the cognitive processes underlying human speech processing. Symposium on ‘Advancing Behavioral and Cognitive Understanding of Speech (ABACUS)’, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 12 January, 2017.
  • Listening in a non-native language in the presence of background noise. Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL, 7 December 2016.
  • Modeling and understanding human spoken-word recognition. Signal Analysis and Interpretation Laboratory, Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering,  Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2 September, 2016.
  • Modelling the role of durational information in human spoken-word recognition. Machine Learning Colloquium Series, Department of Data Sciences, Faculty of Science, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 27 May, 2016.
  • Lexically-guided perceptual learning on the /l/-/r/ continuum: Adaptation to variability in perception. ‘r-atics 5, The fifth international workshop on ‘phonetic, phonological, acquisitional, sociolinguistic and dialect-geographic aspects of rhotics’, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, 19 May, 2016.
  • Modelling the role of durational information in human spoken-word recognition. Good AIfternoon series, Department of Artificial Intelligence, Faculty of Social Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 19 April, 2016.
  • Modelling the role of durational information in human speech segmentation. SimPhon.Net workshop on ‘Usage-based approaches, computational modeling and simulation studies in phonetics and phonology’, Freudenstadt, Germany, 7 April, 2016.
  • Listening in a non-native language in the presence of background noise. Symposium on ‘Psycholinguistic models as explanatory links between lexical access and functional communication deficits’, Delmenhorst, Germany, 15 October, 2015.
  • Computational modelling of spoken-word recognition processes. INSPIRE workshop on ‘Computational models of cognitive processes’, Leuven, Belgium, 2 July, 2015.
  • Comparing human and automatic speech recognition. Errare Workshop, Ermenonville, France, 22 November, 2013.
  • The importance of computational modelling for developing theories of human spoken-word recognition. School of Electrical Engineering, Aalto University, Aalto, Finland, 13 June, 2013.
  • Modelling the use of durational information in human spoken-word recognition. Department of Psychology, University of York, UK, 6 July, 2009.
  • Modelling the use of durational information in human spoken-word recognition. Department of Human Communication Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK, 3 July, 2009.
  • Linking human and automatic speech recognition research. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway, 24 November, 2008.
  • Introduction to Computational Modelling. S2S workshop on ‘Exemplars and abstraction’, Huissen, the Netherlands, 12 February, 2008.
  • Narrowing the gap between ASR and HSR: The SpeM model of human word recognition. Department of Computer Science, University of Sheffield, UK, 9 March, 2006.
  • A multi-pass cohort-based approach to recognition within large vocabulary joint Jupiter/Mercury domain. Spoken Language Systems Group, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA, 26 August, 2004.

Other lectures

  • Listening in a non-native language in the presence of background noise. Colloquium series of the Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University, Nijmegen, 23 February, 2016.
  • Flexible Ears: An introduction. MaxNetAging Graduate Workshop, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, 18 February, 2011.
  • Psycholinguistics and Aging Research. MaxNetAging Research School, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, 12 November, 2010.
  • Avoiding the ham in hamster: Modelling the use of durational information in human spoken-word recognition. Colloquium series of the Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, 18 June, 2009.
  • Experimental methods in psycholinguistics. S2S workshop on ‘Speech Signal Processing, Experimental Design and Signal Manipulation’, Vitoria, Spain, 22 January, 2009.
  • Het modelleren van subtiele fonetische informatie in een computationeel model van menselijke woordherkenning. Meeting of the Dutch Association of Phonetic Sciences, Utrecht, the Netherlands, 18 December, 2008.
  • Een ASR-benadering van psycholinguistische modellen voor woordherkenning. Meeting of the Dutch Association of Phonetic Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 28 September, 2001.